Marketing Innovators Interview Series: Think Like Zuck Author, Ekaterina Walter

| May 8, 2013

TMM Marketing Innovators Intervie Series: Ekaterina WalterTMM is THRILLED to have had a chance to interview Ekaterina Walter, author of the HOT new bestseller ‘Think Like Zuck’. Currently working as a Social Media Innovator for Intel, Ekaterina’s pursuit of building connections, education, and formulating strategies for social business is evident from her impressive resume. From industry speaking engagements, contributing to well-known publications, board member of WOMMA, to her latest publication of the Wall Street Journal Bestseller Think Like Zuck: The Five Business Secrets of Facebook’s Improbably Brilliant CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Ekaterina is a key player in social media.

1. What are some common themes you found each of the young entrepreneurs experienced in the journey of starting their companies?

They were clear on their purpose and the mission of the company. They hired some of the most passionate people they knew and empowered them to make decisions and be successful. They partnered with people who shared their vision and their values. They weren’t afraid to stand up for what they believed in and take risks. And above all, they persevered.

 

2. Describe some key takeaways from your research. Did anything surprise you or change your perception and practice of social media?

Social media is an amazing tool for connections, which later lead to partnerships. One of the things successful startups and businesses do is partner smart (see chapter on Partnerships). Social allowed us the opportunity to connect with people from around the world. Instead of the intrusive nature of cold-calling, social media made our connections ‘warmer’ and more meaningful. That is one of the biggest value-adds and ROI elements of social. Finding the right people to partner with (whether it’s employees, vendors, suppliers, investors or business partners) is essential to the success of any business, small or large.

 

3. What does failing big mean to you? How have you failed big and turned that experience into a success?

Failure is okay as long as you are failing forward. The reality is – everyone fails. But if you don’t try new things and don’t experiment continuously, you will never truly push the limits of what you know or what is possible. To me, failure isn’t really a failure, it is a lesson that makes us wiser. What we do with that knowledge though truly defines us – are we afraid to move forward or are we using the knowledge that we just acquired to our advantage.

There were several instances in my life that I felt like I failed big, just to realize later on that it might have been the best thing that happened to me, as it shaped me as an individual and opened doors for new learnings and new opportunities.

 

4. What do you see as being the next big trends in social media and digital marketing?

Mobile is big. Content marketing will move towards visual storytelling. Brands will learn how to build relationships with the generations of “digital natives.”

In the social era and the times of the information overload, advocacy will become critical.  Advocate Influencers are those customers who are passionate about your brand, but also have broader reach and deeper influence. You want to find those people, engage with them in meaningful ways and make it easier for them to tell your story or to tell their story about your brand. By building relationships with their most influential advocates, brands have an opportunity to truly create movements, not just use their customers to distribute their content.

 

5. Who should we be keeping our eye on (company or individual) that is truly innovating digital marketing practices?

Small businesses. Some of the small and medium businesses do amazing job building relationships with their customers and becoming a part of their communities. They are much better than large brands at creating meaningful advocacy vs. generating a ton of useless impressions.

 

7) Recently you were quoted as stating:
Everything he (Zuck) does consistently supports his purpose of connecting the world and making it more open and transparent. Given Facebook’s recent efforts at making it more difficult for page owners to communicate with followers, do you feel they are still striving toward a more open and connected world?

Facebook was always focused on the users above all else. It is a delicate balance between keeping users happy and keeping brands happy. In the world where brands are fighting for attention it can be somewhat overwhelming for users, so Facebook is trying to make the best choices for the users to be able to preserve the best experience on the site. I am not saying that they are always making the best decisions, but Zuckerberg and his team was always driven by data, they watch the usage data above all else to ensure their decisions are most educated.

 

8. Do you feel Facebook has changed course since going public?

No, Zuckerberg has always stayed on course. That’s why he still maintains full control over the company, even after going public. All of his big moves, even the most recent ones, support his vision of connecting the world and bringing people to the forefront of digital communications.

 

9. Can a company now answering to investors continue to value end-users above all else?

Absolutely. There weren’t a ton of companies that had strong unwavering leadership. It is especially hard to do when you don’t have control over the company. One of the smartest moves that Zuckerberg made was to maintain that control (he owns more than 51% of the company).

 

 

 

Tags: ,

Category: Facebook, Marketing Innovators Interview Series, Recruit 101, Social Media Marketing, Special Agent Intermediate, tmmBosley, tmmCharlie, tmmJill, tmmKelly, TMMPDX, tmmSabrina, Veteran Advanced

Comments are closed.

Heather English FacebookMarketing Innovators Interview SeriesRecruit 101Social Media MarketingSpecial Agent IntermediatetmmBosleytmmCharlietmmJilltmmKellyTMMPDXtmmSabrinaVeteran Advanced ,

TMM Marketing Innovators Intervie Series: Ekaterina WalterTMM is THRILLED to have had a chance to interview Ekaterina Walter, author of the HOT new bestseller ‘Think Like Zuck’. Currently working as a Social Media Innovator for Intel, Ekaterina’s pursuit of building connections, education, and formulating strategies for social business is evident from her impressive resume. From industry speaking engagements, contributing to well-known publications, board member of WOMMA, to her latest publication of the Wall Street Journal Bestseller Think Like Zuck: The Five Business Secrets of Facebook’s Improbably Brilliant CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Ekaterina is a key player in social media.

1. What are some common themes you found each of the young entrepreneurs experienced in the journey of starting their companies?

They were clear on their purpose and the mission of the company. They hired some of the most passionate people they knew and empowered them to make decisions and be successful. They partnered with people who shared their vision and their values. They weren’t afraid to stand up for what they believed in and take risks. And above all, they persevered.

 

2. Describe some key takeaways from your research. Did anything surprise you or change your perception and practice of social media?

Social media is an amazing tool for connections, which later lead to partnerships. One of the things successful startups and businesses do is partner smart (see chapter on Partnerships). Social allowed us the opportunity to connect with people from around the world. Instead of the intrusive nature of cold-calling, social media made our connections ‘warmer’ and more meaningful. That is one of the biggest value-adds and ROI elements of social. Finding the right people to partner with (whether it’s employees, vendors, suppliers, investors or business partners) is essential to the success of any business, small or large.

 

3. What does failing big mean to you? How have you failed big and turned that experience into a success?

Failure is okay as long as you are failing forward. The reality is – everyone fails. But if you don’t try new things and don’t experiment continuously, you will never truly push the limits of what you know or what is possible. To me, failure isn’t really a failure, it is a lesson that makes us wiser. What we do with that knowledge though truly defines us – are we afraid to move forward or are we using the knowledge that we just acquired to our advantage.

There were several instances in my life that I felt like I failed big, just to realize later on that it might have been the best thing that happened to me, as it shaped me as an individual and opened doors for new learnings and new opportunities.

 

4. What do you see as being the next big trends in social media and digital marketing?

Mobile is big. Content marketing will move towards visual storytelling. Brands will learn how to build relationships with the generations of “digital natives.”

In the social era and the times of the information overload, advocacy will become critical.  Advocate Influencers are those customers who are passionate about your brand, but also have broader reach and deeper influence. You want to find those people, engage with them in meaningful ways and make it easier for them to tell your story or to tell their story about your brand. By building relationships with their most influential advocates, brands have an opportunity to truly create movements, not just use their customers to distribute their content.

 

5. Who should we be keeping our eye on (company or individual) that is truly innovating digital marketing practices?

Small businesses. Some of the small and medium businesses do amazing job building relationships with their customers and becoming a part of their communities. They are much better than large brands at creating meaningful advocacy vs. generating a ton of useless impressions.

 

7) Recently you were quoted as stating:
Everything he (Zuck) does consistently supports his purpose of connecting the world and making it more open and transparent. Given Facebook’s recent efforts at making it more difficult for page owners to communicate with followers, do you feel they are still striving toward a more open and connected world?

Facebook was always focused on the users above all else. It is a delicate balance between keeping users happy and keeping brands happy. In the world where brands are fighting for attention it can be somewhat overwhelming for users, so Facebook is trying to make the best choices for the users to be able to preserve the best experience on the site. I am not saying that they are always making the best decisions, but Zuckerberg and his team was always driven by data, they watch the usage data above all else to ensure their decisions are most educated.

 

8. Do you feel Facebook has changed course since going public?

No, Zuckerberg has always stayed on course. That’s why he still maintains full control over the company, even after going public. All of his big moves, even the most recent ones, support his vision of connecting the world and bringing people to the forefront of digital communications.

 

9. Can a company now answering to investors continue to value end-users above all else?

Absolutely. There weren’t a ton of companies that had strong unwavering leadership. It is especially hard to do when you don’t have control over the company. One of the smartest moves that Zuckerberg made was to maintain that control (he owns more than 51% of the company).