Portland Digital Marketing Conference 2013: Content, Strategy, and Optimization

| July 10, 2013

TMMPDX was proud to sponsor and participate in live social media coverage of the 2013 Portland Digital Marketing Conference. A successful two days of networking, learning, and building new connections. For those whom were not in attendance, or looking for a recap, here’s a rundown of highlights from the keynote and bootcamps.

Keynote

JamesCSmith

James Smith
@JamesC_Smith

The classical art and sculpture at the Portland Art Museum’s sunken ballroom was an inspirational setting to hear keynote speaker Justin Levy, Senior Social Communications Manager at Citrix Online.

Justin provided 13 steps for transforming social media efforts into a true social business.  The classical art setting enhanced Justin’s points about moving from the out of date check list social approach into modern social business.  While Justin’s prescriptions stem from his experience at a large enterprise (Citrix 2012 revenue:  $2.59 billion, 8,212 employees), the list is useful to any size business as they evolve into a social business:

1.         Open Your Ears

2.         Establish Social Media Guidelines

3.         Develop A Crisis Response Plan

4.         Establish Social Governance

5.         Form a Social Business Council

6.         Communicate Often

7.         Think Like a Media Publisher

8.         Develop Objectives and Goals

9.         Decide On the Right Tools for the Job

10.       Build an Integrated Plan

11.       Create an Editorial Calendar

12.       Measure Success

13.       Test, Tweak & Iterate

Justin emphasized that the social media guidelines should include be for both employees and community members.  This stage of the framework forces you to think about what kind of tone you want and the type of community you want to build.  This will inform your thinking for your social media governance and crisis response plans.

Forming the social business council is another key point. As Justin mentioned, one needs to include all stakeholders, including IT, HR and legal.  If you are a small business this may mean including the entire team.  Embracing Social Business will require significant changes in the way you do business.  Including everyone impacted in the planning and ongoing guidance will keep all oars rowing in the same direction.   And this group will be essential in developing your social media guidelines, governance and council.

 

Bootcamps

Daniel Kawamoto

Daniel Kawamoto
@djkawamoto

Truly One-to-One Messaging Strategy

The Truly One-to-One Messaging Strategy Bootcamp was a great reminder that sometimes it’s okay to get caught up in really granular details about who your audience is. Or, perhaps better, who is in your audience and identifying the unique aspects of their persona. This Bootcamp session was spent almost entirely creating personas for the unique product Google Glass. The session divided into teams and came up with a long list of traits that should be identified. Then, each team created a person with a name that would likely be a Google Glass customer. The most important take-away, although pretty basic on the surface, was to make sure you are asking questions to hone in on the right message for the right audience. First, you have to know your audience.

Content Marketing: Moving from Theory to Practice

In Content Marketing: Moving from Theory to Practice, Darcie and Julie talked about how looking at the essential elements of a story can help you create better, more effective content. This session was also a reminder to ask questions. They divided this into three acts.

Act 1: Set the scene

  • What’s the setting (your market)?
  • What’s the reality for your brand?
  • When/where does the story take place?
  • Who are your heroes?
  • What goal are you trying to achieve?

Act 2: Conflict/Drama

  • What are your challenges?
  • What solutions are you exploring?
  •  What role does your brand play in this?

Act 3: The final resolution

  • What’s the outcome?
  • What’s the morale?
  • What’s next? (The cliffhanger)

They went through a lot of strategy bulletproofing and content creation best practices. Finally, they reminded us that it is easy to get lost measuring everything. Only measure something that has an insight and an action associated with it. Otherwise you’re probably wasting your time.

JamesCSmith

James Smith
@JamesC_Smith

Optimize Your Analytics to Measure Success

Adam Ware, Craig Gaylon, Ashley Stuart of SwellPath lead a deep dive into Google Analytics with their Optimize Your Analytics to Measure Success Bootcamp session. They divided their presentation into three parts:  analytics strategies, tricks, and tools for Organic, SEO & Social and Paid Media.

Adam started by emphasizing that first analytics needed to measure the goals and objectives of the business.  Then in his section on analytics for organic search, Adam identified non-branded search visits as the example KPI we would review.  This immediately led to a problem – how do we isolate non-branded search visits from our data?  Adam showed us how to use regular expressions and filters within Google Analytics to accomplish this task, and then to use Shortcuts and Custom Reports to save these steps for future use. Further details and the entire SwellPath deck are available on Slide Share http://www.slideshare.net/SwellPath/swellpath-optimize-your-analytics-to-measure-success-pdx-dmc-2013?from_search=4

SwellPath

Next Ashley discussed analytics for SEO & Social Media.  A key point raised by Ashley centered on handling the increasing number of (not provided) entries returned by Google Analytics.  Ashley highlighted research from notprovidedcount.com that (not provided) represents almost 40% of traffic on the sites that they track.  At the current rate of growth, notprovidedcount.com estimates that (not provided) will reach 100% of traffic by July 2016.

Ashley then walked through a framework and formula for accounting for (not provided), but even more helpfully pointed to a tool that calculates the estimate from your inputted data – http://www.mikearnesen.com/seo-tools/not-provided/

In discussing analytics for Paid Media, Greg Galyon focused on four useful tools for in Google Analytics:

  • Attribution – why it matters
  • Position Analysis – how to maximize ROI
  • Mobile – how to bid with enhanced campaigns
  • Dashboards

A major take-away was Greg’s emphasis that 2013 really IS the year of mobile despite several years of similar claims. Greg said this mainly because Google is making it so with their enhanced campaign changes.  Of major issue to analytics, Google Analytics and Google Ad words define mobile differently!  Google Analytics includes mobile phones and tablets under mobile, while Ad Words only includes mobile phones.

Analysts need to create custom segments to separate phones and tablets within Google Analytics to get a clearer picture of mobile value as defined by Ad Words.  Thanks Google!  Further details and the entire SwellPath deck are available on Slide Share http://www.slideshare.net/SwellPath/swellpath-optimize-your-analytics-to-measure-success-pdx-dmc-2013?from_search=4

 

The 2013 Portland Digital Marketing Conference offered many great takeaways, most popular sessions including: Content Marketing, Digital Experience and Optimizing Your Analytics. High level strategy and marketing channel optimization took precedence over tactical focused topics. Sessions incorporating group projects and hands-on learning were most successful at driving audience engagement and participation.

In my own reflection of the conference, I’m continually impressed by the rich connections and passion our local community has for digital marketing. The Portland digital marketing scene may be small, but mighty, full of diverse experience and drive to empower others with knowledge. I personally would like to thank my team of Tweeters: Jeff Johnson, Steph Prange, James Smith, Daniel Kawamoto, Brian McClary, Amanda Walsh, and Amanda Bernhard. Many thanks for your most effective efforts, resulting in ranking #PDXDMC second on the daily Twitter trends for June 19th! In addition, a special mention for Jennifer Portis in her outstanding leadership and organization of this conference. Cheers to all those involved for making the 2013 Portland Digital Marketing Conference a grand success!

 

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Category: Marketing Events, tmmBosley, tmmCharlie, tmmJill, tmmKelly, TMMPDX, tmmSabrina

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https://www.tmmpdx.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/logo.png Heather English Marketing EventstmmBosleytmmCharlietmmJilltmmKellyTMMPDXtmmSabrina ,

TMMPDX was proud to sponsor and participate in live social media coverage of the 2013 Portland Digital Marketing Conference. A successful two days of networking, learning, and building new connections. For those whom were not in attendance, or looking for a recap, here’s a rundown of highlights from the keynote and bootcamps.

Keynote

JamesCSmith

James Smith
@JamesC_Smith

The classical art and sculpture at the Portland Art Museum’s sunken ballroom was an inspirational setting to hear keynote speaker Justin Levy, Senior Social Communications Manager at Citrix Online.

Justin provided 13 steps for transforming social media efforts into a true social business.  The classical art setting enhanced Justin’s points about moving from the out of date check list social approach into modern social business.  While Justin’s prescriptions stem from his experience at a large enterprise (Citrix 2012 revenue:  $2.59 billion, 8,212 employees), the list is useful to any size business as they evolve into a social business:

1.         Open Your Ears

2.         Establish Social Media Guidelines

3.         Develop A Crisis Response Plan

4.         Establish Social Governance

5.         Form a Social Business Council

6.         Communicate Often

7.         Think Like a Media Publisher

8.         Develop Objectives and Goals

9.         Decide On the Right Tools for the Job

10.       Build an Integrated Plan

11.       Create an Editorial Calendar

12.       Measure Success

13.       Test, Tweak & Iterate

Justin emphasized that the social media guidelines should include be for both employees and community members.  This stage of the framework forces you to think about what kind of tone you want and the type of community you want to build.  This will inform your thinking for your social media governance and crisis response plans.

Forming the social business council is another key point. As Justin mentioned, one needs to include all stakeholders, including IT, HR and legal.  If you are a small business this may mean including the entire team.  Embracing Social Business will require significant changes in the way you do business.  Including everyone impacted in the planning and ongoing guidance will keep all oars rowing in the same direction.   And this group will be essential in developing your social media guidelines, governance and council.

 

Bootcamps

Daniel Kawamoto

Daniel Kawamoto
@djkawamoto

Truly One-to-One Messaging Strategy

The Truly One-to-One Messaging Strategy Bootcamp was a great reminder that sometimes it’s okay to get caught up in really granular details about who your audience is. Or, perhaps better, who is in your audience and identifying the unique aspects of their persona. This Bootcamp session was spent almost entirely creating personas for the unique product Google Glass. The session divided into teams and came up with a long list of traits that should be identified. Then, each team created a person with a name that would likely be a Google Glass customer. The most important take-away, although pretty basic on the surface, was to make sure you are asking questions to hone in on the right message for the right audience. First, you have to know your audience.

Content Marketing: Moving from Theory to Practice

In Content Marketing: Moving from Theory to Practice, Darcie and Julie talked about how looking at the essential elements of a story can help you create better, more effective content. This session was also a reminder to ask questions. They divided this into three acts.

Act 1: Set the scene

  • What’s the setting (your market)?
  • What’s the reality for your brand?
  • When/where does the story take place?
  • Who are your heroes?
  • What goal are you trying to achieve?

Act 2: Conflict/Drama

  • What are your challenges?
  • What solutions are you exploring?
  •  What role does your brand play in this?

Act 3: The final resolution

  • What’s the outcome?
  • What’s the morale?
  • What’s next? (The cliffhanger)

They went through a lot of strategy bulletproofing and content creation best practices. Finally, they reminded us that it is easy to get lost measuring everything. Only measure something that has an insight and an action associated with it. Otherwise you’re probably wasting your time.

JamesCSmith

James Smith
@JamesC_Smith

Optimize Your Analytics to Measure Success

Adam Ware, Craig Gaylon, Ashley Stuart of SwellPath lead a deep dive into Google Analytics with their Optimize Your Analytics to Measure Success Bootcamp session. They divided their presentation into three parts:  analytics strategies, tricks, and tools for Organic, SEO & Social and Paid Media.

Adam started by emphasizing that first analytics needed to measure the goals and objectives of the business.  Then in his section on analytics for organic search, Adam identified non-branded search visits as the example KPI we would review.  This immediately led to a problem – how do we isolate non-branded search visits from our data?  Adam showed us how to use regular expressions and filters within Google Analytics to accomplish this task, and then to use Shortcuts and Custom Reports to save these steps for future use. Further details and the entire SwellPath deck are available on Slide Share http://www.slideshare.net/SwellPath/swellpath-optimize-your-analytics-to-measure-success-pdx-dmc-2013?from_search=4

SwellPath

Next Ashley discussed analytics for SEO & Social Media.  A key point raised by Ashley centered on handling the increasing number of (not provided) entries returned by Google Analytics.  Ashley highlighted research from notprovidedcount.com that (not provided) represents almost 40% of traffic on the sites that they track.  At the current rate of growth, notprovidedcount.com estimates that (not provided) will reach 100% of traffic by July 2016.

Ashley then walked through a framework and formula for accounting for (not provided), but even more helpfully pointed to a tool that calculates the estimate from your inputted data – http://www.mikearnesen.com/seo-tools/not-provided/

In discussing analytics for Paid Media, Greg Galyon focused on four useful tools for in Google Analytics:

  • Attribution – why it matters
  • Position Analysis – how to maximize ROI
  • Mobile – how to bid with enhanced campaigns
  • Dashboards

A major take-away was Greg’s emphasis that 2013 really IS the year of mobile despite several years of similar claims. Greg said this mainly because Google is making it so with their enhanced campaign changes.  Of major issue to analytics, Google Analytics and Google Ad words define mobile differently!  Google Analytics includes mobile phones and tablets under mobile, while Ad Words only includes mobile phones.

Analysts need to create custom segments to separate phones and tablets within Google Analytics to get a clearer picture of mobile value as defined by Ad Words.  Thanks Google!  Further details and the entire SwellPath deck are available on Slide Share http://www.slideshare.net/SwellPath/swellpath-optimize-your-analytics-to-measure-success-pdx-dmc-2013?from_search=4

 

The 2013 Portland Digital Marketing Conference offered many great takeaways, most popular sessions including: Content Marketing, Digital Experience and Optimizing Your Analytics. High level strategy and marketing channel optimization took precedence over tactical focused topics. Sessions incorporating group projects and hands-on learning were most successful at driving audience engagement and participation.

In my own reflection of the conference, I’m continually impressed by the rich connections and passion our local community has for digital marketing. The Portland digital marketing scene may be small, but mighty, full of diverse experience and drive to empower others with knowledge. I personally would like to thank my team of Tweeters: Jeff Johnson, Steph Prange, James Smith, Daniel Kawamoto, Brian McClary, Amanda Walsh, and Amanda Bernhard. Many thanks for your most effective efforts, resulting in ranking #PDXDMC second on the daily Twitter trends for June 19th! In addition, a special mention for Jennifer Portis in her outstanding leadership and organization of this conference. Cheers to all those involved for making the 2013 Portland Digital Marketing Conference a grand success!